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How To Get Bike Oil Out Of Clothes

While I was browsing the internet, I stumbled upon a bunch of tips on how to get bike oil out of clothes with substances found in most households. But guess what? I found a lack of solid evidence to back up their effectiveness. So, I decided to take matters into my own hands and personally tested each of these widely shared methods, one by one. And now, I’ve got the results right here for you. Check it out!

What Did I Use?

  • an old toothbrush
  • shampoo
  • baking soda
  • vinegar
  • dishwashing liquid
  • water

Why Do These Substances Work?

Shampoo and dishwashing liquid are excellent for removing grease stains due to their ability to combat oil and fat. On the other hand, baking soda and vinegar offer natural alternatives to chemical-based options.[1]

How Did I Test Them?

I took an old T-shirt and cut out a piece. First, I tried the stain removal effect of the shampoo and the dishwashing liquid separately on the fabric. Then, I repeated the experiment, but this time I also added a combination of vinegar and baking soda to the shampoo and dishwashing liquid.

First Try: Using Only Shampoo

  • I rinsed the stain with cold water
  • Applied a little shampoo on it
  • Rubbed the fabric gently with a toothbrush for about 20 seconds.
  • Let the shampoo work for about 5 minutes

Second Try: Using Only Dishwashing Liquid

  • I rinsed the stain with cold water
  • Applied a little dishwashing liquid on it
  • Rubbed the fabric gently with a toothbrush for about 20 seconds.
  • Let the dishwashing liquid work for about 5 minutes

Third Try: Using Shampoo And The Combination of Baking Soda And Vinegar

  • I rinsed the stain with cold water
  • Put a little baking soda on it
  • Added a small amount of vinegar to the baking soda, causing it to produce a foaming reaction.
  • After 3-4 minutes, I applied a little shampoo on it
  • Rubbed the fabric gently with a toothbrush for about 20 seconds.
  • Let the mix work for about 5 minutes

Fourth Try: Using Dishwashing Liquid And The Combination of Baking Soda And Vinegar

  • I rinsed the stain with cold water
  • Put a little baking soda on it
  • Added a small amount of vinegar to the baking soda, causing it to produce a foaming reaction.
  • After 3-4 minutes, I applied a little dishwashing liquid on it
  • Rubbed the fabric gently with a toothbrush for about 20 seconds.
  • Let the mix work for about 5 minutes

After I finished this fourth attempt, I gave the fabric a nice rinse in the washing machine and set it out to dry.

Here Are The Results

As you can see, neither shampoo nor dishwashing detergent managed to fully get rid of the oil stain, although they did a pretty good job. But guess what? When we mixed them with baking soda and vinegar, both combo did a pretty thorough job! Just a heads up though, the third and the fourth method left a slight pale blemish, which might suggest some potential fabric damage.

Additional Research I Made

After this experiment, I did some extra research to see if there’s a gentler way to tackle grease stains, and I stumbled upon a video that might just be worth giving a shot! This method can be a good alternative if you are afraid of damaging the fabric of your dress.

Conclusion

So what do we learn from this? Sometimes a combination of things can make all the difference. While shampoo and dishwashing liquid are great on their own, mixing them with baking soda and vinegar enhances their stain-removal effectiveness.

The above methods may not be suitable for all types of fabrics. Some fabrics are sensitive to the chemicals and may become damaged or discolored when treated with them.

FAQ

Q: How much does it to get bike oil out of clothes?

A: You can easily find the used items in most households, so it’ll only cost you a few cents.

Q: How long does it to take to get bike oil out of clothes?

A: These methods require a little bit of time and patience, but it should not take more than 30 minutes.

Q: Will these methods work on any type of fabric?

A: No, some fabrics might get damaged or discolored when treated with these substances. It’s always best to do a patch test before applying to the entire stain. Alternatively, you can try a special grease stain remover.

Q: Can I use WD-40 to remove a grease stain?

A: While some people suggest it, I don’t recommend using WD-40 on clothing. It can potentially cause discoloration and damage to the fabric, so it’s best to explore other options.

Q: Can these methods remove oil stains from clothes on the first try?

A: Well, not always. Sometimes you just have to give it another try to completely get rid of the stain!

What To Do Now

Now that we’ve covered how to get bike oil out of your clothes, it’s time to think about preventing oil stains. A great way to do this is by properly storing your bicycle to prevent unnecessary oil leaks. Check out our guide on how to store bicycles outside and save your clothes from future oil stains!

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Author

Mate is a passionate bikepacking enthusiast and the founder of this website. He loves exploring new destinations, admiring nature, and engaging in outdoor activities. He strongly believes that healthy living should be environmentally friendly too, which is why he prefers to use bicycles for his transport needs.